The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.

16/06/12, 7-9pm
17/06/12, 1-5pm

On Saturday 16th June, Daniella Norton and Andrea Slater will not be exhibiting work that
makes them comfortable.

The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.

Rather than installing a large painting and a video projection they intend to devote time to developing work that in the first instance feels ‘odd’, but also ‘new’ or even ‘exciting’. Rather
than exhibit work, they will begin by asking what both ‘work’ and ‘exhibition’ can mean.

The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.

The large painting and video projection will not be present. Instead, the artists will use a strategy to create work between each others decisions. Things will be left for each other to respond to, to change, to deny or to enhance. It is this collaborative approach that shall take place, culminating in an exhibition. Culminating in a conclusion, of sorts.

The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.

Artist Daniella Norton has recently made a discovery in her painting practice.
Artist Andrea Slater has recently discovered the limits of writing proposals.

The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.

Central to the intentions behind the creation of this body of work is the importance of finding time. For a number of reasons, both artists have spent time negating the importance of their art practice. These reasons for negating are of obvious familial importance. But how important is their art practice? Should they stop altogether? Or, should they re-emerge, still as people, but different artists?

Artists Daniella Norton and Andrea Slater have reached a point in time (June 2012) where expressing and interpreting their shared engagement with practice has become essential.
Who were we yesterday?

There are 24 hours in the day. Casually, one is able to assume that eight hours is for sleep, eight hours is work, and the final eight hours is for recreation. Potentially, we could consider
of an art practice having a foot in each of these periods. This is too comfortable though isn’t it? ‘Life’ gets in the way! Children and bills, teaching and administration. The washing
machine is on the blink. The canvas needs priming.

The artists have intentionally created a working relationship with their own time. It is a necessary condition of modern life that a timetable be created for ‘life management’. During the installation period of this exhibition, the artists will be using a rota of availability, taking on
responsibility for each other’s young children in order to complete their shifts. Life continues, but in this case life continues around the preparation of an exhibition. Artists at work, at play, at sleep.

The painting of a Twickenham pink house will not sit alongside a Victorian couple by the lake.